FIYH 12: Preacher As Mediator of Meaning

Lots of ink and byte-space is expended to emphasize the priest as acting in the person of Christ, but the bishops develop the notion of the preacher as a mediator:

[12] The person who preaches in the context of the liturgical assembly is thus a mediator, representing both the community and the Lord. The assembly gathers for liturgy as a community of faith, believing that God has acted in human history and more particularly, in their own history. The community gathers to respond to this living and active God. They may also gather to question how or whether the God who once acted in human history is still present and acting today. They may wonder how this God, whom the Scriptures present as so powerful and so loving, can be experienced in lives today that seem so broken and meaningless. How can parents believe in a God who raises the dead to life when their daughter has just been killed in a car accident? How can a family hope in a God who leads his people out of slavery into freedom when they are trapped in an inflationary spiral in which costs increase and the buying power of their salaries diminishes? How can young people join with the angels and saints in praise of the glory of God when they are struggling with the challenges of establishing their own identities and their relationship to family and friends?

This is more than a simplistic faith-sharing, but it treats the core of our interaction with God. How do we find the parallels from our faith history in our own lives? The preacher must be a pastoral minister steeped in a living Christian faith tradition, making that bridge between what God has done and the hope of what God can do.

(All texts from Fulfilled in Your Hearing are copyright © 1982 USCCB. All rights reserved. Used with permission.)

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About catholicsensibility

Todd and his family live in Ames, Iowa. He serves a Catholic parish of both Iowa State students and town residents.
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