Ordination Rites: Ordination of a Priest 23-25

Let’s continue the ordination Mass for a priest, okay? Some important rituals await. First up, the investiture with stole and then the chasuble:

23. After the prayer of consecration, the bishop, wearing his miter, sits, and the newly ordained stands. The assisting priests return to their places, but one of them arranges the stole of the newly ordained as it is worn by priests and vests him in a chasuble.

Chrism is used on the individual for the first time since Confirmation:

ANOINTING OF HANDS

24. Next the bishop receives a linen gremial and anoints with chrism the palms of the new priest as he kneels before him. The bishop says:

The Father anointed our Lord Jesus Christ through the power of the Holy Spirit.

May Jesus preserve you to sanctify the Christian people and to offer sacrifice to God.

Meanwhile the music ministry leads the assembly in song. First choice is a hymn, second is Psalm 110, and third is another “appropriate song.”

25. While the new priest is being vested in stole and chasuble and the bishop is anointing his hands, the hymn Veni, Creator Spiritus or the following antiphon may be sung with Psalm 110.

Christ the Lord, a priest for ever in the line of Melchizedek, offered bread and wine.

The antiphon is repeated after every two verses. Glory to the Father is not said. The psalm is interrupted and the antiphon repeated when the hands of the priest have been anointed.

Any other appropriate song may be sung.

Then the bishop and the new priest wash their hands.

Any comments?

 

About these ads

About catholicsensibility

Todd and his family live in Ames, Iowa. He serves a Catholic parish of both Iowa State students and town residents.
This entry was posted in Ordination Rites, post-conciliar liturgy documents, Rites. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Ordination Rites: Ordination of a Priest 23-25

  1. FrMichael says:

    Like most of my classmates, I didn’t use the lemon when washing my hands: wanted the feel and smell of the chrism to remain.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s