PCS 100: Preparations for Anointing

The introduction to Anointing makes sound suggestions for the preparation of the celebration, including the assistance of family, friends, and faith community: 

The priest should inquire about the physical and spiritual condition of the sick person and he should become acquainted with the family, friends, and others who may_be present. The sick person and others may help to plan the celebration, for example, by choosing the readings and prayers. It will be especially helpful if the sick person, the priest, and the family become accustomed to praying together.

Note the emphasis on the Word, that readings and a homily are an expectation:

In the choice of readings the condition of the sick person should be kept in mind. The readings and the homily should help those present to reach a deeper understanding of the mystery of human suffering in rela­tion to the paschal mystery of Christ.

The rite may be celebrated at bedside, if necessary. But the rite is very concerned with the pastoral aspects: comfort of the ones being anointed, space for loved ones and the faith community, and concerns for the dignity of the sacrament and the impression given to non-believers: 

The sick person who is not confined to bed may take part in the sacrament of anointing in a church, chapel, or other appropriate place. He or she should be made comfortable, and there should be room for relatives and friends. In hospitals and other institutions the priest should consider all who will be present for the celebration: whether they are able to take part; whether they are very weak; and, if they are not Catholic, whether they might be offended.

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About catholicsensibility

Todd and his family live in Ames, Iowa. He serves a Catholic parish of both Iowa State students and town residents.
This entry was posted in Pastoral Care of the Sick, post-conciliar liturgy documents, Rites. Bookmark the permalink.

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