PCS 239-240: Introductory Rites

These sections cover the introductory rites. In order, the priest leads the sick person and others present with a ritual greeting (239), and an instruction that includes a Scripture passage (240).

239. The priest greets the sick person and the others present. One of the following may be used as described in (PCS) 81.

If communion as viaticum is celebrated during the rite, the priest then places the blessed sacrament on the table, and all join in adoration.

240. If the occasion requires, the priest speaks to the sick person about the celebration of the sacraments.

Depending on the circumstances, he reads a brief gospel text or an instruction to invite the sick person to repentance and the love of God.

A Matthew 11:28-30

B John 6:40

C The priest may use the following instruction, or one better adapted to the sick person’s condition:

Beloved in Christ, the Lord Jesus is with us at all times, warming our hearts with his sacramental grace. Through his priests he forgives the sins of the prepentant; he strengthens the sick through holy anointing; to all who watch  for his coming, he gives the food of his body and blood to sustain them on their last journey, confirming their hope of eternal life. Our brother/sister has asked to receive these three sacraments: let us help him/her with our love and our prayers.

The brief passages from the gospels are helpful. Omitting them doesn’t seem particularly thrifty in terms of time or the stamina of the dying person. The instruction here is also good, and again reinforces Church teaching on the nature of the Eucharist, in part, as food for the believer.

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About catholicsensibility

Todd and his family live in Ames, Iowa. He serves a Catholic parish of both Iowa State students and town residents.
This entry was posted in Pastoral Care of the Sick, post-conciliar liturgy documents, Rites. Bookmark the permalink.

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