RCIA Coming Up

img_6803There are no less than 597 sections treating the Rites of Christian Initiation. At the pace of one section per post per day, we’d finish up sometime near the end of 2010.

With some aspects we’ll delve deeply as we touch upon matters of import to the modern Church: catechesis, discernment, ministry, liturgy, and music. No doubt there will be others. Some aspects we’ll skip over, like Initiation of a Person in Danger of Death, already covered in our examination of the Pastoral Care rites.

As it is, I expect to take about a year with this website’s review of RCIA. Along the way, we’ll explode some myths (like RCIC, or that the initiation rites are optional, or that baptized Christians must be integrated into the catechumenate community) and we’ll invite commentary from the reader, both your personal experiences and your theological and pastoral reflections.

Just to give you a broad view of what’s ahead, we’ll look at the “GICI,” the general introduction to Christian Initiation. (It serves all the initiation rites as the GIRM does the Mass.) Its thirty-five sections will get us into the month of March. The RCIA has its own particular introduction, another thirty-five sections that will probably take us through the end of Lent.

Beyond that, the rite offers sections 36 through 251 for initiation in ordinary circumstances: a full catechumenate for unbaptized persons. Looking at the steps and periods will likely take us deep into the summer. From there, we’ll look at various rites for “particular circumstances,” such as what to do with children of catechetical age, catechized non-Catholics, uncatechized Christians, plus some combination rites. By the time we get to the end of the section (RCIA 597) on acclamations, hymns, and songs, we’ll tackle the thirty-seven sections of the national statutes for the US, particular law for my country’s parishes and dioceses, and approved in Rome in 1988. My best guess is that sometime between this coming Christmas and Easter 2010, we’ll finish RCIA and move on to the funeral rites.

Whether or not that is appropriate, I’ll leave to your humor and judgment. Any first comments?

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About catholicsensibility

Todd and his family live in Ames, Iowa. He serves a Catholic parish of both Iowa State students and town residents.
This entry was posted in post-conciliar liturgy documents, RCIA, Rites. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to RCIA Coming Up

  1. FrMichael says:

    Ought to be a good read. Vamonos!

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