Bring Out the Tromba!

The French want the African vuvuzela banned from the stadiums. Except for the efficient and devastating German side, it seems the monotone B♭ is suppressing scoring at the World Cup.

Captain Patrice Evra:

We can’t sleep at night because of the vuvuzelas. People start playing them from 6 a.m. We can’t hear one another out on the pitch because of them.

I kind of like the background noise as the young miss and I watch the games. Though you might guess as an ensemble guy I would like to see some drums and singing, too. When we watched those 60-minute Brit game replays on tv in the 70′s, my brother and I used to marvel at the singing. I bet the South Africans could expand a bit on their horns’ monotone.

For those concerned about the spreading of germs through that plastic mouthpiece, I’d like to offer my suggestion of the tromba marina. It’s a big instrument. It has but one string. I bet a convincing outdoor replica could be made of plastic. Plus, I love playing harmonics on string instruments.

So as you consider the music of soccer today, let an Italian set the tone for today’s late match with this concerto for a number of instruments, including violins “in tromba marina.”

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About catholicsensibility

Todd and his family live in Ames, Iowa. He serves a Catholic parish of both Iowa State students and town residents.
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3 Responses to Bring Out the Tromba!

  1. David D. says:

    If you used to watch replays of the old First Division back in the 70’s then you should be familiar with that uniquely English roar in reaction to a home goal, the sound of jubilation with a heavy undercurrent of menace. The vuvuzela pretty much eliminates the element of crowd noise, especially for the television viewer, and, thus, at least some of the drama.

  2. Randolph Nichols says:

    If I had not turned off the tv that droning B-flat would have forced me to imitate Schumann’s leap into the Rhein (well, make it the Concord River).

    What exactly is the purpose of that sustained noise? I agree with David, it interferes with the drama of the game itself.

    While we’re on the subject of sports drama: GO CELTICS!

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