GILM 69: Weekdays


Let’s talk about weekday readings …

69. The weekday readings have been arranged in the following way.

1. Each Mass has two readings: the first is from the Old Testament or from an Apostle (that is, either from a Letter or from the Book of Revelation), and during the Easter season from the Acts of the Apostles; the second, from the Gospels.
2. The yearly cycle for Lent has its own principles of arrangement, which take into account the baptismal and penitential character of this season.
3. The cycle for the weekdays of Advent, the Christmas season, and the Easter season is also yearly and the readings thus remain the same each year.
4. For the thirty-four weeks of Ordinary Time, the weekday Gospel readings are arranged in a single cycle, repeated each year. But the first reading is arranged in a two-year cycle and is thus read every other year. Year I is used during odd-numbered years; Year II, during even-numbered years.

Like the Order for Sundays and festive days, then, the weekday Order of Readings is governed by similar application of the principles of harmony and of semicontinuous reading, especially in the case of seasons with their own distinctive character.

Commentary:

Lent is mentioned first as a locus for readings which point not only to penance, but also the initiation focus of the season.

On the thirty-four weeks, we start with Mark’s Gospel in the first weeks, proceed to Matthew, and finish with Luke in the Fall. Two or three times a year, you might find a Sunday-weekday confluence within a few days depending on what is treated in the particular gospels.

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About catholicsensibility

Todd and his family live in Ames, Iowa. He serves a Catholic parish of both Iowa State students and town residents.
This entry was posted in General Introduction to the Lectionary, post-conciliar liturgy documents, Scripture. Bookmark the permalink.

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