GIRM 53: Gloria in Excelsis

When you sing the Gloria, do you choose option 2 (antiphonal or responsorial), option 1, or option 3?

53. The Gloria in excelsis (Glory to God in the highest) is a most ancient and venerable hymn by which the Church, gathered in the Holy Spirit, glorifies and entreats God the Father and the Lamb. The text of this hymn may not be replaced by any other. It is intoned by the Priest or, if appropriate, by a cantor or by the choir; but it is sung either by

  • everyone together, or
  • by the people alternately with the choir,
  • or by the choir alone.

If not sung, it is to be recited either by everybody together or by two choirs responding one to the other.

It is sung or said on Sundays outside Advent and Lent, and also on Solemnities and Feasts, and at particular celebrations of a more solemn character.

This provides an interesting option, especially if one interprets “solemn” in the liturgical way, appropriately festive. Occasionally I get an inquiry about singing it at a wedding. But I’m also thinking special celebrations opening and closing a school year, on a pilgrimage, on a celebration like Thanksgiving. Any others?

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About catholicsensibility

Todd and his family live in Ames, Iowa. He serves a Catholic parish of both Iowa State students and town residents.
This entry was posted in GIRM, post-conciliar liturgy documents. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to GIRM 53: Gloria in Excelsis

  1. FrMichael says:

    Right now, Option One: the same setting being used across all the Masses.

    Eventually, once the new words are well-known by all, Options Two and Three will return.

  2. Gerry Kirk says:

    I’ve started having it said at the Masses where I “do” music. Honestly, the settings are just too long, or the assemblies find them too boring. At least now everyone is involved in the saying.

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