GIRM 124-127: More Introductory Rites

Very little changed in the period 1975-2011 on what takes place between the opening procession and the first reading:

124. Once all this has been done, the Priest goes to the chair. When the Entrance Chant is concluded, with everybody standing, the Priest and faithful sign themselves with the Sign of the Cross. The Priest says: In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. The people reply, Amen.

Then, facing the people and extending his hands, the Priest greets the people, using one of the formulas indicated. The Priest himself or some other minister may also very briefly introduce the faithful to the Mass of the day.

125. The Penitential Act follows. After this, the Kyrie is sung or said, in accordance with the rubrics (cf. no. 52).

126. For celebrations where it is prescribed, the Gloria in excelsis (Glory to God in the highest) is either sung or said (cf. no. 53).

127. The Priest then calls upon the people to pray, saying, with hands joined, Let us pray. All pray silently with the Priest for a brief time. Then the Priest, with hands extended, says the Collect, at the end of which the people acclaim, Amen.

Commentary:

Introductory remarks are optional, and if done shoulod be “very brief.” My thinking is two sentences, maximum. But omission is preferable.

Note the presciption for silence after the priest calls upon the people to pray. This silence is indicated, and should be longer than any introductory remarks. Do your clergy follow this? This would be an example of a needful and positive implementation of the MR3: a caution that we all, especially the clergy, look at practices that add to the celebration of Mass and increase its potential for fruitfulness.

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About catholicsensibility

Todd and his family live in Ames, Iowa. He serves a Catholic parish of both Iowa State students and town residents.
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