RDCA I, 22-23: House of God and People

Rubrics on the homily:

22. When the readings are finished the homily is given, in which the biblical readings are elucidated and the significance of the rite explained: Christ is the cornerstone of the Church, and the temple that is going to be built by the living Church of the community of believers will be at once the house of God and the house of God’s people.

Given recent news on the closing and re-opening of churches, note how the rite describes the structure. Granted, the bishop is certainly numbered among “the living Church,” but the emphasis here is clearly on the local community. Bishops preside. They do so with the symbols of the shepherd. The implication is that they serve with responsibilities more than they rule with personal rights.

A nod to local custom:

23. After the homily, according to the custom of the place, the document of the blessing of the foundation stone and of the beginning of the building of the church may be read; it is signed by the bishop and by representatives of those who are going to work on the building of the church, and together with the stone, is enclosed in the foundation.

Those who work on the building: the most obvious would be the team of architect, head contractor, and workers. That is a European tradition, I believe. In my experience, this also includes the pastor and building committee, or at least its leadership. What would you include?

 

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About catholicsensibility

Todd and his family live in Ames, Iowa. He serves a Catholic parish of both Iowa State students and town residents.
This entry was posted in Rite of Dedication of a Church and an Altar, Rites. Bookmark the permalink.

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