EG 43: Looking at Traditional Customs

Vasnetsov_Maria_MagdaleneThomas Aquinas and Augustine assist us in examining tradition in Evangelii Gaudium 43:

43. In her ongoing discernment, the Church can also come to see that certain customs not directly connected to the heart of the Gospel, even some which have deep historical roots, are no longer properly understood and appreciated. Some of these customs may be beautiful, but they no longer serve as means of communicating the Gospel. We should not be afraid to re-examine them. At the same time, the Church has rules or precepts which may have been quite effective in their time, but no longer have the same usefulness for directing and shaping people’s lives. Saint Thomas Aquinas pointed out that the precepts which Christ and the apostles gave to the people of God “are very few”.[S. Th., I-II, q. 107, a. 4] Citing Saint Augustine, he noted that the precepts subsequently enjoined by the Church should be insisted upon with moderation “so as not to burden the lives of the faithful” and make our religion a form of servitude, whereas “God’s mercy has willed that we should be free”.[S. Th., I-II, q. 107, a. 4] This warning, issued many centuries ago, is most timely today. It ought to be one of the criteria to be taken into account in considering a the reform of the Church and her preaching which would enable it to reach everyone.

Summing up:

  • Long tradition is not enough
  • Neither is the beauty of a tradition
  • Believers are not in servitude to things ineffective or no longer useful
  • Primary are the reform of the Church and the fruitfulness of our preaching
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About catholicsensibility

Todd and his family live in Ames, Iowa. He serves a Catholic parish of both Iowa State students and town residents.
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One Response to EG 43: Looking at Traditional Customs

  1. Pingback: Mediator Dei 111-112 | Catholic Sensibility

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