Mediator Dei 145-146

Pope Pius XII emphasizes interiority again. This time, in connection with the daily prayer of the Church:

145. To this lofty dignity of the Church’s prayer, there should correspond earnest devotion in our souls. For when in prayer the voice repeats those hymns written under the inspiration of the Holy Ghost and extols God’s infinite perfections, it is necessary that the interior sentiment of our souls should accompany the voice so as to make those sentiments our own in which we are elevated to heaven, adoring and giving due praise and thanks to the Blessed Trinity; “so let us chant in choir that mind and voice may accord together.”[Saint Benedict, Regula Monachorum, c. 19] It is not merely a question of recitation or of singing which, however perfect according to norms of music and the sacred rites, only reaches the ear, but it is especially a question of the ascent of the mind and heart to God so that, united with Christ, we may completely dedicate ourselves and all our actions to Him.

Another way of pondering this is that our innermost being, our heart and mind and soul, ought to align with the words we pray. Can we find in the Scriptures, the psalms, and in “hymns written under the inspiration” of God, the alignment within of what we are speaking and saying on the outside?

Christ is always in our prayers, as the target of petitions as well as the means through which we approach the Father.

146. On this depends in no small way the efficacy of our prayers. These prayers in fact, when they are not addressed directly to the Word made (flesh), conclude with the phrase “though Jesus Christ our Lord.” As our Mediator with God, He shows to the heavenly Father His glorified wounds, “always living to make intercessions for us.”[Heb. 7:25]

Mediator Dei on the Vatican web site.

About these ads

About catholicsensibility

Todd and his family live in Ames, Iowa. He serves a Catholic parish of both Iowa State students and town residents.
This entry was posted in Mediator Dei, pre-conciliar documents. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s