Dies Domini 41: Relationship and Jewish Roots

Let’s finish up Pope John Paul II’s look at the Liturgy of the Word:

41. It should also be borne in mind that the liturgical proclamation of the word of God, especially in the Eucharistic assembly, is not so much a time for meditation and catechesis as a dialogue between God and his People, a dialogue in which the wonders of salvation are proclaimed and the demands of the Covenant are continually restated.

This dialogue presumes a relationship.

On their part, the People of God are drawn to respond to this dialogue of love by giving thanks and praise, also by demonstrating their fidelity to the task of continual “conversion”.

Continuing conversion is a hallmark of the baptized believer. Sunday presumes baptism. Each Sunday is an Easter, so the connection is inherent in the liturgy:

The Sunday assembly commits us therefore to an inner renewal of our baptismal promises, which are in a sense implicit in the recitation of the Creed, and are an explicit part of the liturgy of the Easter Vigil and whenever Baptism is celebrated during Mass. In this context, the proclamation of the word in the Sunday Eucharistic celebration takes on the solemn tone found in the Old Testament at moments when the Covenant was renewed, when the Law was proclaimed and the community of Israel was called — like the People in the desert at the foot of Sinai (cf. Ex 19:7-8; 24:3,7) — to repeats its “yes”, renewing its decision to be faithful to God and to obey his commandments.

An intriguing premise here, that the proclamation of the Word remains essentially a tradition passed on from Judaism.

In speaking his word, God awaits our response: a response which Christ has already made for us with his “Amen” (cf. 2 Cor 1:20-22), and which echoes in us through the Holy Spirit so that what we hear may involve us at the deepest level.(Cf. Ordo Lectionum Missae, Praenotanda, Chap. I, No. 6.)

What do you think?

The Vatican site has Dies Domini in its entirety.

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About catholicsensibility

Todd and his family live in Ames, Iowa. He serves a Catholic parish of both Iowa State students and town residents.
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