EG 193: Fidelity to the Gospel

Vasnetsov_Maria_MagdalenePope Francis urges us to “Fidelity to the Gospel, lest we run in vain.”

193. We incarnate the duty of hearing the cry of the poor when we are deeply moved by the suffering of others.

This is typically Ignatian. A cursory reading suggests a very clinical, logical approach to the situation of the poor. But the Holy Father, in suggesting we be “deeply moved,” nudges us toward the level of the heart. Are we in solidarity with the poor because we think we have to be, or because we feel it at a deep level? What was the witness of other saints? Francis, for example? Jesus himself? These people are our guides, as is the Lord.

Some Scriptural witness:

Let us listen to what God’s word teaches us about mercy, and allow that word to resound in the life of the Church. The Gospel tells us: “Blessed are the merciful, because they shall obtain mercy” (Mt 5:7). The apostle James teaches that our mercy to others will vindicate us on the day of God’s judgement: “So speak and so act as those who are to be judged under the law of liberty. For judgement is without mercy to one who has shown no mercy, yet mercy triumphs over judgement” (Jas 2:12-13). Here James is faithful to the finest tradition of post-exilic Jewish spirituality, which attributed a particular salutary value to mercy: “Break off your sins by practising righteousness, and your iniquities by showing mercy to the oppressed, that there may perhaps be a lengthening of your tranquillity” (Dan 4:27). The wisdom literature sees almsgiving as a concrete exercise of mercy towards those in need: “Almsgiving delivers from death, and it will purge away every sin” (Tob 12:9). The idea is expressed even more graphically by Sirach: “Water extinguishes blazing fire: so almsgiving atones for sin” (Sir 3:30). The same synthesis appears in the New Testament: “Maintain constant love for one another, for love covers a multitude of sins” (1 Pet 4:8). This truth greatly influenced the thinking of the Fathers of the Church and helped create a prophetic, counter-cultural resistance to the self-centred hedonism of paganism. We can recall a single example: “If we were in peril from fire, we would certainly run to water in order to extinguish the fire… in the same way, if a spark of sin flares up from our straw, and we are troubled on that account, whenever we have an opportunity to perform a work of mercy, we should rejoice, as if a fountain opened before so that the fire might be extinguished”.[SAINT AUGUSTINE, De Catechizandis Rudibus, I, XIX, 22: PL 40, 327]

Leave it to the Bishop of Hippo to give us a memorable and lyric turn of phrase. What do you think about all this? The Biblical witness is rather extensive, and Pope Francis just scratches the surface with six citations.

Evangelii Gaudium is online here.

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About catholicsensibility

Todd and his family live in Ames, Iowa. He serves a Catholic parish of both Iowa State students and town residents.
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