Proclamation of the Date of Easter


If you’re not bothering with three “kings” bringing up gifts on Sunday, perhaps you’re ready to go with the proclamation of the date of Easter. Does anybody do this? Have you ever heard it done, and if so, how? Just curious.

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About catholicsensibility

Todd lives in the Pacific Northwest, serving a Catholic parish as a lay minister.
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2 Responses to Proclamation of the Date of Easter

  1. Yes, we do sing the Proclamation of the Date of Easter at my Parish, Saint Thomas Aquinas, Diocese of Phoenix, on Epiphany Sunday. However, we only sing the Proclamation at the 10:45 am Solemn Mass. In my parish the proclamation is sung at the conclusion of the Homily, in accord with the Sacramentary Supplement.

    We also sing the Proclamation of the Birth of Christ on Christmas Eve at the Solemn Midnight Mass. This Proclamation is sung during the Introductory Rites, just before the Gloria and in place of the Penitential Rite, in accord with the Sacramentary Supplement.

    The Third and final proclamation is the Easter Proclamation. Known better as the Exultet. As this is part of the Easter Vigil it is sung at the prescribed location. Special attention should be given to this Proclamation as it is the only Proclamation that is specifically prescribed to be sung by a Priest. If it is sung by the Priest, it should be sung in its entirety, if it is sung by the Deacon, there are just 2 lines that are omitted. When sung by a Cantor, or Lay Person, there are several places where text is to be omitted.

  2. I do exactly the same at my parish (St. Vincent de Paul, Denver), except that we have a deacon chant the Proclamation of the Date of Easter at all Epiphany Masses. We use the melody printed in the Sacramentary for the Exultet, and use the melodies in the Sacramentary Supplement for the other two proclamations.

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