Perseus Holds A Comet

Comet 17P/Holmes is now visible for Northern Hemisphere stargazers. On Wednesday this week some outburst from this two-mile-wide body kicked up its brightness from magnitude 17 to nearly 2, a factor of about a half-million.

Chris Peterson of Cloudbait Observatory in Colorado has this telescopic image:

© Copyright 2007, Chris L Peterson. All rights reserved.

Sky and Telescope provides a map for you:

This is the sky just after dusk in the early evening. Face northeast. Perseus looks rather cartoonish with the constellation lines drawn in, but he was actually a bad-ass action hero in his mythological day. No danger of him hurling this comet toward Earth, though. We’ve known about Comet 17P/Holmes for over a century. Until the middle of this week, it was just a faint ball of dirty ice in a seven-year orbit. It will likely send lots of astronomy enthusiasts out into the next few cold Fall evenings to catch a glimpse.

About catholicsensibility

Todd lives in the Pacific Northwest, serving a Catholic parish as a lay minister.
This entry was posted in Astronomy, constellations. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Perseus Holds A Comet

  1. realworldnumbers says:

    Hey, I’ve got some personal shots of this comet on my page from Newmarket, Ontario, Canada.

    I basically used my telescope and my canon A620.

    I’d appreciate the link. Thanks!

    Check it out at http://realworldnumbers.wordpress.com/2007/10/26/hunting-for-comet-holmes-at-home/

  2. Dustin says:

    Having a hell of a time spotting it, with the moon sitting right on top of Perseus and blotting out everything nearby. I’m only working with low power binoculars, and have yet to see anything that isn’t a star. I can barely even make out Perseus’ outline, so I may not even be looking in the right spot. Have you had any luck?

  3. Todd says:

    No I haven’t, but my neighborhood is filled with trees and I wasn’t able to get out to the ASKC site Saturday to have a look. There’s so much light pollution, I can’t make out any Perseus stars early in the night when it’s close to the horizon.

  4. John Eisele says:

    This comet ushes in great prophesy! Amen. Hosana!

    you may email me with inquiries: johneisele1@yahoo.com

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