GILH 225-230: Solemnities

The next rank of liturgical observance, the solemnity, can be identified in the LH because they have an evening prayer celebrated on the vigil:


225. Solemnities have an evening prayer I on the preceding day.

226. At evening prayer I and II, the hymn, the antiphons, the short reading with its responsory, and the concluding prayer are proper. Where anything proper is missing, it is supplied from the common.

EPI finds psalms from the Laudate collection:

In keeping with an ancient tradition, at evening prayer I both psalms are as a rule taken from the Laudate Psalms (Ps 113, 117, 135, 146, 147 A, 147 B). The New Testament canticle is noted in its appropriate place. At evening prayer II the psalms and canticles are proper; the intercessions are either proper or from the common.

227. At morning prayer, the hymn, the antiphons, the short reading with its responsory, and the concluding prayer are proper. Where anything proper is missing, it is supplied from the common. The psalms are to be taken from the Sunday of Week I of the four-week psalter; the intercessions are either proper or from the common.

228. In the office of readings, everything is proper: the hymn, the antiphons and psalms, the readings and the responsories. The first reading is from Scripture; the second is about the saint. In the case of a saint with a purely local cult and without special texts even in the local proper, everything is taken from the common.

It would seem a local bishop should be able to make a determination for the instance of a “local cult.”

At the end of the office of readings the Te Deum and the proper prayer are said.

229. At daytime prayer, the hymn of the weekday is used, unless other directions are given. The psalms are from the Gradual Psalms with a proper antiphon. On Sundays the psalms are taken from the Sunday of Week I of the four-week psalter and the short reading and concluding prayer are proper. But on certain solemnities of the Lord there are special psalms.

230. At night prayer, everything is said as on Sundays, after evening prayer I and II respectively.

Rather detailed, but any comments?

About catholicsensibility

Todd lives in Minnesota, serving a Catholic parish as a lay minister.
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