GILM 123-125: Heading, Incipit, Final Acclamation

Wrapping up the final three numbered sections of the GILM, the Church treats with a few small details. First, the “heading” to the Scripture passage, something I don’t find terribly helpful:

123. There is a heading prefixed to each text, chosen carefully (usually from the words of the text itself) in order to point out the main theme of the reading and, when necessary, to make the connection between the readings of the same Mass clear.

The Lectionary passage may include a short phrase of introduction in the text of the reading, something a little more clear than, “He said to them …”

124. In this Order of Readings the first element of the incipit is the customary introductory phrase: “At that time,” “In those days,” “Brothers and Sisters,” “Beloved,” “Dearly Beloved,” “Dearest Brothers and Sisters,” or “Thus says the Lord,” “Thus says the Lord God.” These words are not given when the text itself provides sufficient indication of the time or the persons involved or where such phrases would not fit in with the very nature of the text. For the individual languages, such phrases may be changed or omitted by decree of the competent Authorities.

After the first words of the incipit the Order of Readings gives the proper beginning of the reading, with some words deleted or supplied for intelligibility, inasmuch as the text is separated from its context. When the text for a reading is made up of non-consecutive verses and this has required changes in wording, these are appropriately indicated.

The people get the final (spoken) word, as it were:

125. In order to facilitate the congregation’s acclamation, the words for the reader The word of the Lord, or similar words suited to local custom, are to be printed at the end of the reading for use by the reader.

Any thoughts of comments on this material? Tomorrow, we’ll finish up with a few final words on the General Introduction to the Lectionary for Mass, then head into the remainder of Holy Week document-free.

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About catholicsensibility

Todd lives in the Pacific Northwest, serving a Catholic parish as a lay minister.
This entry was posted in General Introduction to the Lectionary, post-conciliar liturgy documents. Bookmark the permalink.

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