Post 7000

On the occasion of the seven-thousandth post on Catholic Sensibility, I’d like to muse a bit. Looking back and looking forward.

I really appreciate you readers, especially those who comment to be supportive or challenging. I cannot foresee running a blog without comment boxes, and I’m pleased we’ve been able to have great discussions over the years. So thanks to you all: regulars and occasional visitors and one-time guests.

I resisted starting a blog for a few years. Back in 2003, I thought I had missed the golden years of blogging. I wasn’t sure I wanted to try to squeeze in after a few dozen months of commenting on conservative Catholic sites. They were mostly sincere Catholics just trying to find their way in the world of terrorism-come-home and bishops-asleep-at-the-wheel. I had a life outside the internet. I didn’t want to be consumed by what I saw (and still see) as the inherent narcissism of this medium. I do appreciate my blogging companions, especially the ones that challenged me. Thanks for keeping me sharp. Really.

In the almost-eight years of this blog, we’ve experienced many momentous events in Catholicism: a new pope, a contentious 2008 American election, some high profile deaths and funerals, and the ongoing Catholic angst about abortion, homosexuality, and euthanasia. Plus federal politics, the economy, the nature of cooperation with evil, and the ongoing experience of sorting how to be a Catholic in an online age.

As for this site, I’m pleased that we’ve managed to post and discuss the entire published content of the Vatican II documents–a feat unparalleled in the blogosphere. We’re well on our way to completing an overview of the post-conciliar liturgy corpus, including all of the major sacramental rites. Nobody else has even scratched the surface, and I confess I do feel proud to have amassed, with your help, a significant chunk of Catholic history and liturgy. The object has been to conduct this examination like a parish adult-ed series would be done: present the texts and share insights, observations, opinions, and good practices. A lot of bloggers fashion themselves as catechetical experts. I do not. But I also don’t shy away from information. This will continue to be a focus of this site for the foreseeable future.

If you’ve been following every post, I don’t have a degree or certificate to offer you. Just consider yourself well informed.

Speaking of that future, who knows what the next thousand posts will bring. We’ll finally get around to tackling the GIRM. Redemptionis Sacramentum. The liturgical publications of Pope John Paul II. USCCB documents on music and art. The rites dedicating a church. I’m considering setting aside liturgy after Liturgiam Authenticam and tackling the General Catechetical Directory. Or maybe running that in parallel to another liturgy document. It’s been some time since Neil and I cracked the 100-post a month bar. Would two documents at a time be too much?

But a blog wouldn’t feel like a real blog without comments. Hold the praise, please, but simply suggest what topics you would like to discuss here.

Oh, and the image above? It’s the North American Nebula, otherwise known as NGC 7000. It was captured by the Spitzer Space Telescope, credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech. You wouldn’t expect a momentous post on this blog without touching on astronomy, would you?

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About catholicsensibility

Todd and his family live in Ames, Iowa. He serves a Catholic parish of both Iowa State students and town residents.
This entry was posted in Astronomy, The Blogosphere. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Post 7000

  1. MJM says:

    Congrats my friend!

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