The Armchair Liturgist: Names in the Intercessions

In my parish we mention deceased people by name in the Sunday Prayers of the Faithful, if the family requests it. We frequently mention the sick, though not always. Sometimes people prefer to remain anonymous. And once, someone was listed on the prayer chain, requested Sunday prayers, but “got better” and worshiped in church that weekend.

Sit in the purple chair and render a liturgist’s judgment, if you will. Would you continue such practices? Would you add names other than anointing of the sick? Should the Sunday assembly pray by name for freshly baptized infants, just-married couples, and newly ordained clerics? Why or why not?

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About catholicsensibility

Todd and his family live in Ames, Iowa. He serves a Catholic parish of both Iowa State students and town residents.
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5 Responses to The Armchair Liturgist: Names in the Intercessions

  1. LIam says:

    I have no problem with specific names, so long as they are part of a general intercession for people similarly situated, as it were.

  2. Charles says:

    I “assemble” the UP, Todd, and have never listed specific names. That’s what our Book of the Sick is for, and that is mentioned weekly in the UP. Deceased, yes, as well as those written in the Book of the Dead. I believe that you’ve talked about the UP as a potential vehicle for delivering local “news,” which belies the term general intentions.

    • Todd says:

      Charles, I tend to agree. I would prefer not to get specific with names, causes (like NFP Week) or maybe even events (like WYD). However, it’s not enough of a sticking point for me to swim against the current. Also, I have to note that the Rites of the Church do have sample intercessions that name the baptized, the dead, and the like by name. And is that really different from Sunday Mass? Perhaps so. Perhaps not.

  3. Brendan Kelleher svd says:

    The list can get endless. Having encountered examples of long lists both here in Japan and back in the UK, I’d opt for naming them in the parish bulletin, on the bulletin board or a special book for the sick that can be displayed in an appropriate location.

    • Todd says:

      Endless? isn’t that the truth. In my last parish, I had names on a three-week rotation to keep the lector from listing off up to thirty names every weekend. When the pastor tells you to do it …

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