Dies Domini 14: Sanctified and Loving

Some further elaboration on the metaphor of marriage. But John Paul II wants his readers to be aware of a more complete context to Sunday. First, Sunday is sanctified and declared the Lord’s own day:

14. In the first place, therefore, Sunday is the day of rest because it is the day “blessed” by God and “made holy” by him, set apart from the other days to be, among all of them, “the Lord’s Day”.

And to be sure, Sunday is not God’s only day. God does not cede the other six days of the week to other forces and powers.

In order to grasp fully what the first of the biblical creation accounts means by keeping the Sabbath “holy”, we need to consider the whole story, which shows clearly how every reality, without exception, must be referred back to God. Time and space belong to him. He is not the God of one day alone, but the God of all the days of humanity.

We pick up on recent themes: the Commandments, and the metaphor of marital love as a fitting image to bring to the creature-Creator relationship:

Therefore, if God “sanctifies” the seventh day with a special blessing and makes it “his day” par excellence, this must be understood within the deep dynamic of the dialogue of the Covenant, indeed the dialogue of “marriage”. This is the dialogue of love which knows no interruption, yet is never monotonous. In fact, it employs the different registers of love, from the ordinary and indirect to those more intense, which the words of Scripture and the witness of so many mystics do not hesitate to describe in imagery drawn from the experience of married love.

The Vatican site has Dies Domini in its entirety.

About catholicsensibility

Todd lives in the Pacific Northwest, serving a Catholic parish as a lay minister.
This entry was posted in Dies Domini, post-conciliar liturgy documents. Bookmark the permalink.

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