Dives in Misericordiae 12c: When Justice Is Distorted

Divine_Mercy_Sanctuary_in_Vilnius4St John Paul suggests not everything that gets off to a good start realizes the true justice of the original intent. We are only human.

And yet, it would be difficult not to notice that very often programs which start from the idea of justice and which ought to assist its fulfillment among individuals, groups and human societies, in practice suffer from distortions.

What is described next is simply sin. People lose sight of the goals. And newcomers or agitators or good people with good intentions can knowingly or unknowingly run an effort off its rails:

Although they continue to appeal to the idea of justice, nevertheless experience shows that other negative forces have gained the upper hand over justice, such as spite, hatred and even cruelty. In such cases, the desire to annihilate the enemy, limit his freedom, or even force him into total dependence, becomes the fundamental motive for action; and this contrasts with the essence of justice, which by its nature tends to establish equality and harmony between the parties in conflict.

St John Paul speaks of ends justifying means. It takes great discipline for us mortal beings to eschew short-cuts. Such should be viewed with great skepticism, especially when justified by the premise that our opponents use them as well.

True justice will take the high road, and that might often seem a wandering path in the wilderness:

This kind of abuse of the idea of justice and the practical distortion of it show how far human action can deviate from justice itself, even when it is being undertaken in the name of justice. Not in vain did Christ challenge His listeners, faithful to the doctrine of the Old Testament, for their attitude which was manifested in the words: An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.”(Mt. 5:38) This was the form of distortion of justice at that time; and today’s forms continue to be modeled on it. It is obvious, in fact, that in the name of an alleged justice (for example, historical justice or class justice) the neighbor is sometimes destroyed, killed, deprived of liberty or stripped of fundamental human rights.

Let’s remember at this juncture that DiM is a document more about mercy than its subset, justice. Mercy is a far greater force, and we must tap into it before letting our personal slant on justice allow us to run roughshod over others.

The experience of the past and of our own time demonstrates that justice alone is not enough, that it can even lead to the negation and destruction of itself, if that deeper power, which is love, is not allowed to shape human life in its various dimensions. It has been precisely historical experience that, among other things, has led to the formulation of the saying: summum ius, summa iniuria. This statement does not detract from the value of justice and does not minimize the significance of the order that is based upon it; it only indicates, under another aspect, the need to draw from the powers of the spirit which condition the very order of justice, powers which are still more profound.

Any comments?

Dives in Misericordia, the second encyclical of Pope John Paul II, is available online here, and is copyright © 1980 – Libreria Editrice Vaticana

About catholicsensibility

Todd lives in the Pacific Northwest, serving a Catholic parish as a lay minister.
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