Ballad For A Spy Wednesday

Two cautions, upfront. I’m not really big on the fascination with Judas Iscariot, so two posts in a week is a bit much for me. Also, I’m not the biggest fan of English Victorian literature, but a colleague alerted me to this poem by Robert Buchanan.

At the end, after a fruitless wandering after-life:

‘Twas the Bridegroom stood at the open door,
And beckon’d, smiling sweet;
‘Twas the soul of Judas Iscariot
Stole in, and fell at his feet.

‘The Holy Supper is spread within,
And the many candles shine,
And I have waited long for thee
Before I poured the wine!’

The supper wine is poured at last,
The lights burn bright and fair,
Iscariot washes the Bridegroom’s feet,
And dries them with his hair.

Is it presumptuous to think of a welcome end like this? It is certainly within the Lord’s bounds of mercy and forgiveness. It seems as presumptuous to me to consign certain persons to hell. Fervor in this regard seems to usurp the Last Judge.

About catholicsensibility

Todd lives in the Pacific Northwest, serving a Catholic parish as a lay minister.
This entry was posted in Art, Jubilee of Mercy. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Ballad For A Spy Wednesday

  1. Liam says:

    And such presumption and fervor can be forgiven, too, right?

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