A Fourth Way

… to sainthood. Because the other three aren’t always adequate to find the right fit. NCRep news bit here. The secretary of the Vatican Congregation for Saints’ Causes, Archbishop Marcello Bartolucci wrote:

(T)he new norms arise from the sainthood congregation wanting to look into the question of whether men and women who, “inspired by Christ’s example, freely and willingly offered and sacrificed their life” for others “in a supreme act of charity, which was the direct cause of death,” were worthy of beatification. For example, throughout history there have been Christians who willingly put themselves at risk and died of infection or disease because of aiding and serving others, he wrote.

Seems like there’s an opening here for parents. Or even children who care for elderly parents.

Looks like the end of a process:

Francis approved the congregation carrying out an in-depth study of the new proposal in early 2014, the archbishop wrote. After extensive input, discussion and the work of experts, the cardinal and bishop members of the Congregation for Saints’ Causes approved in 2016 “a new pathway for beatification of those who offered their lives with explicit and recognized Christian” reasons.

Looks like a good thing to me. Any observations?

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About catholicsensibility

Todd lives in the Pacific Northwest, serving a Catholic parish as a lay minister.
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4 Responses to A Fourth Way

  1. Liam says:

    http://www.news.va/en/news/pope-francis-creates-new-category-for-beatificatio

    The English translation of the new MP is not yet available from the Vatican, only Italian and Latin.

  2. Devin Rice says:

    Perhaps the official translation will clarify, but I am not sure I see the necessity of this “new path” .

    I understand conceptually that the “free and willing offer of one’s life and a heroic acceptance, out of love, of a certain and early death; the heroic act of charity and the premature death are connected” attenuates the need for heroic Christian virtue to ordinary Christian virtue, but I would imagine that in practical terms any case that would follow the new path could more or less be pigeonholed in the first path as well.

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