Christus Vivit 187-188: A Relationship With The Elderly

In Chapter Six, Pope Francis delves into the theme, Young people with roots. Today, a look across the generations with “Your relationship with the elderly.”

187. At the Synod, we heard that “the young are focused on the future and they face life with energy and dynamism. But they are also tempted… to give little attention to the memory of the past from which they come, in particular the many gifts transmitted to them by their parents, their grandparents and the cultural experience of the society in which they live. Helping the young to discover the living richness of the past, to treasure its memory and to make use of it for their choices and opportunities, is a genuine act of love towards them, for the sake of their growth and the decisions they are called to make”.[FD 35]

A good observation from the youth synod final document. The exchange of experiences and knowledge between youth and elders–it’s not a one-way street–is important for cementing bonds between the generations.

The Bible offers good advice: discern who seems wise and intelligent:

188. The word of God encourages us to remain close to the elderly, so that we can benefit from their experience: “Stand in the assembly of the elders. Who is wise? Cling to him… If you see an intelligent man, visit him; let your foot wear out his doorstep” (Sir 6:34.36).

Like the image? “Let your foot wear out the doorstep.” I love it.

In every case, the long years they lived and all they have experienced in life should make us look to them with respect: “You shall rise up before the hoary head” (Lev 19:32). For “the glory of young men is their strength, but the beauty of old men is their grey hair” (Prov 20:29).

Any comments? The Post-Synodal Apostolic Exhortation is on this link at the Vatican site.

The text in color is © Copyright – Libreria Editrice Vaticana

About catholicsensibility

Todd lives in the Pacific Northwest, serving a Catholic parish as a lay minister.
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