Something Other Than Merry

One of the official holiday stamps issued by the U.S. Postal Service features a silhouette of the Holy Family fleeing to Egypt. The image, released Oct. 10, is a change from the portrayal of Madonna and child featured on the Christmas stamp for close to 50 years. (CNS photo/U.S. Postal Service) (Oct. 11, 2012) See STAMP Oct. 11, 2012.

If we must greet people with the word “Christmas,” why are some Christians stuck on the word “merry” as a preface? Let’s try another salvo in the war on the war on Christmas …

The usage of the term “merry Christmas” isn’t all that old. Post-Trent if my few internet sources can be trusted.  Merry pretty much means “happy” in a warm fireplace, stuffed-full-of-food, slightly-tipsy kind of way. It does separate the feast from birthdays, Easter, and anniversaries.

It seems everyone else is leaving a yellow spot in the snow in their political discussions these days. If we wanted to be different, distinctive, and above the partisan fray, a suggestion or two:

What about “Holy Christmas” or “Blessed Christmas”? The truth is that not everybody’s caught up in the “Happy Holidays” thing. Some atheists even use the big MC in their seasonal greetings. They probably wouldn’t use a more religious modifier.

My only request: since I have a few days of Advent left, save the Christmas greeting, if you can, until Tuesday evening.

About catholicsensibility

Todd lives in the Pacific Northwest, serving a Catholic parish as a lay minister.
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1 Response to Something Other Than Merry

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