Christus Vivit 236-237: Looking To Emmaus

Pope Francis notes the synod writers suggested we look at one particular post-Resurrection narrative for guidance.

236. Youth ministry, when it ceases to be elitist and is willing to be “popular”, is a process that is gradual, respectful, patient, hopeful, tireless and compassionate.

I think of the sacramental directive in Christian initiation that uses well that first word: gradual. Catechumenal formation is intended to be gradual and complete. There is no hurry-up offense. Not in youth ministry either:

The Synod proposed the example of the disciples of Emmaus (cf. Lk 24:13-35) as a model of what happens in youth ministry.

237. “Jesus walks with two disciples who did not grasp the meaning of all that happened to him, and are leaving Jerusalem and the community behind. Wanting to accompany them, he joins them on the way. He asks them questions and listens patiently to their version of events, and in this way he helps them recognize what they were experiencing. Then, with affection and power, he proclaims the word to them, leading them to interpret the events they had experienced in the light of the Scriptures. He accepts their invitation to stay with them as evening falls; he enters into their night. As they listen to him speak, their hearts burn within them and their minds are opened; they then recognize him in the breaking of the bread. They themselves choose to resume their journey at once in the opposite direction, to return to the community and to share the experience of their encounter with the risen Lord”.[FD 4]

Here’s a fine work of art to illustrate this. And this triptych in my home diocese. Any thoughts?

The Holy Father’s Post-Synodal Apostolic Exhortation can be found on this link. The text in color is © Copyright – Libreria Editrice Vaticana

About catholicsensibility

Todd lives in the Pacific Northwest, serving a Catholic parish as a lay minister.
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