Redemptoris Missio 5cd: The Mediation of Christ

What is the Biblical witness for Christ the Savior?

In the Gospel of St. John, this salvific universality of Christ embraces all the aspects of his mission of grace, truth and revelation: the Word is “the true light that enlightens every man” (Jn 1:9). And again, “no one has ever seen God; the only Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, he has made him known” (Jn 1:18; cf. Mt 11:27). God’s revelation becomes definitive and complete through his only-begotten Son: “In many and various ways God spoke of old to our fathers by the prophets; but in these last days he has spoken to us by a Son, whom he appointed the heir of all things, through whom he also created the world” (Heb 1:1-2; cf. Jn 14:6). In this definitive Word of his revelation, God has made himself known in the fullest possible way. He has revealed to (humankind) who he is. This definitive self-revelation of God is the fundamental reason why the Church is missionary by her very nature. She cannot do other than proclaim the Gospel, that is, the fullness of the truth which God has enabled us to know about himself.

A non-Christian would, of course, say that the use of the Bible to prove Christ as the sole means of salvation doesn’t really prove anything. For people of Christian faith, such proof is really unnecessary. If it is, we’re talking about fact, not faith.

The witness of faith of the New Testament authors is significant:

Christ is the one mediator between God and (humankind): “For there is one God, and there is one mediator between God and (people), the man Christ Jesus, who gave himself as a ransom for all, the testimony to which was borne at the proper time. For this I was appointed a preacher and apostle (I am telling the truth, I am not lying), a teacher of the Gentiles in faith and truth” (1 Tm 2:5-7; cf. Heb 4:14-16). No one, therefore, can enter into communion with God except through Christ, by the working of the Holy Spirit. Christ’s one, universal mediation, far from being an obstacle on the journey toward God, is the way established by God himself, a fact of which Christ is fully aware. Although participated forms of mediation of different kinds and degrees are not excluded, they acquire meaning and value only from Christ’s own mediation, and they cannot be understood as parallel or complementary to his.

The question remains: does the Second Person choose to mediate through other experiences outside of the Word or the Church?

This document is available online here and is © Copyright – Libreria Editrice Vaticana

 

About catholicsensibility

Todd lives in Minnesota, serving a Catholic parish as a lay minister.
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