Gaudete: A Sunday or a Week?

My pastor left the rose bit amongst the main Advent colors this week. I remember the third Sunday color being up last year for the full week.

We talked a bit about Advent II and the O Antiphons in our parish podcast today. It got me thinking. Maybe it’s the second stage of the Advent season that needs that lift of a different color to signify a change in tone. If we shifted to rose for the post-December 16th period, I wouldn’t lobby for a return. A week of Gaudete would highlight the shift as we neared the Nativity.

Of course, that is all about the daily cycle of readings and prayers at Mass and in the Hours. The Sundays of Advent are really on a different track. And most Catholic parishioners who are regulars at Mass are paying more attention on Sunday than weekdays.

In the old days, I used to be a stickler about singing the O Antiphons–fourth Sunday only. These years, not so much. I still save Veni Emmanuel for the end of the season. But there are many adaptations of the O’s–some of the music is quite good and worthy.

About catholicsensibility

Todd lives in Minnesota, serving a Catholic parish as a lay minister.
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2 Responses to Gaudete: A Sunday or a Week?

  1. Liam says:

    Seems like a solution in search of a problem.The shift in orations already provided for would seem to suffice. It’s not as if the culture is keeping the pending arrival of Christmas quiet or hidden. Perhaps the engineered problem is a perceived disjunct with the culture by this time in December. Even so, one might wonder whether and how it registers among Sunday pew dwellers.

    • Quite right. Sunday Catholics, if conscious of such things, are likely more aware of the war on Advent as much as anything else. As for the rose Sundays, I can’t say they really register as much different aside from the trappings of decoration.

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