Aperuit Illis 4: A Heritage For All

The return from Exile is recounted in the books of Ezra and Nehemiah. Pope Francis zeroes in on the commitment of the returnees to the Law, a moment of tears swept aside into joy:

4. The return of the people of Israel to their homeland after the Babylonian exile was marked by the public reading of the book of the Law. In the book of Nehemiah, the Bible gives us a moving description of that moment. The people assembled in Jerusalem, in the square before the Water Gate, to listen to the Law. They had been scattered in exile, but now they found themselves gathered “as one” around the sacred Scripture (Neh 8:1). The people lent “attentive ears” (Neh 8:3) to the reading of the sacred book, realizing that in its words they would discover the meaning of their lived experience. The reaction to the proclamation of was one of great emotion and tears: “[The Levites] read from the book, from the law of God, clearly; and they gave the sense, so that the people understood the reading. And Nehemiah, who was the governor, and Ezra the priest and scribe, and the Levites who taught the people said to all the people, ‘This day is holy to the Lord your God; do not mourn or weep’. For all the people wept when they heard the words of the law. Then he said to them, ‘Go your way, eat the fat and drink sweet wine and send portions to him for whom nothing is prepared; for this day is holy to our Lord; and do not be grieved, for the joy of the Lord is your strength’” (Neh 8:8-10).

How does this affect us twenty-some centuries later? One of the way we can engage the Bible is to view our own lives and experiences in light of the stories, teachings, poetry, and biographies we find there.

These words contain a great teaching. The Bible cannot be just the heritage of some, much less a collection of books for the benefit of a privileged few. It belongs above all to those called to hear its message and to recognize themselves in its words. At times, there can be a tendency to monopolize the sacred text by restricting it to certain circles or to select groups. It cannot be that way. The Bible is the book of the Lord’s people, who, in listening to it, move from dispersion and division towards unity. The word of God unites believers and makes them one people.

The Bible isn’t meant only for those who read it at Mass or in schools, or for those who are deemed as its proper interpreters. The Holy Father suggests it is a locus of unity, as it was for the believers who returned from Babylon and sought to reclaim their religious and spiritual heritage.

The full document can be read here. The text reproduced from it is © Copyright – Libreria Editrice Vaticana.

About catholicsensibility

Todd lives in the Pacific Northwest, serving a Catholic parish as a lay minister.
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